There is a report from Nielson revealing what kids desire for Christmasin 2011.

24 percent want an iPad
18 percent want a computer
18 percent want an E-Reader
17 percent want a television
17 percent want a tablet computer
16 percent want a Blu-Ray player
15 percent want an iPhone
14 percent want a Smartphone
12 percent want a Xbox Kinect
9 percent want the Nintendo Wii
9 percent want a Playstation 3
8 percent want an iPod Touch
8 percent want a Microsoft XBox 360
5 percent want a Playstation Move
5 percent want a Nintendo DS
4 percent want a Mobile Phone
3 percent want a Playstation Portable

A Christmas Story

Image via Wikipedia

In the Christmas classic movie A Christmas Story, Ralphie, a young boy growing up in the ’40’s, dreams of owning a Red Rider BB gun. He sets out to convince the world this is the perfect gift. But along the way, he runs into opposition from his parents, his teacher, and even good ‘ol Santa Claus himself. “You’ll put your eye out” was the constant rebuff, but undeterred little Ralphie pressed on with his desire for a Red Rider BB Gun with a compass in the stock.

When I was growing up the presents we desired were a bit more useful but there was always that one big item we all wished for. Whether it was a bike or the latest hot toy advertised on the radio or TV.

Baseball gloves and bats where big items for boys, and dolls and a doll house were the items most requested by the girls. I grew up in the era of Tonka trucks and Lego building blocks.

Looking over this years wish list I do not see any bikes, roller skates, hula hoops, jump ropes, Tonka trucks or Red Rider BB guns. Every item on this list is one electronic gadget after another. All of which none of us growing up in the old days ever knew of or thought of. Notice also how none of these gadgets require any real outdoor activity to take place. And we wonder why our children are so hyper active today and overweight. Could it be there are not enough roller skates, baseball gloves and Red Rider BB guns under our Christmas trees?

Over the years, the legendary Neiman Marcus Christmas catalog has featured some pretty extravagant gifts. The 1963 catalog offered his-and-her submarines for $18,000. In the 1964 catalog, you could buy a hot air balloon for $6,000. In 1967, the catalog’s offerings included a pair of camels for $4,000. And in 1971, an actual mummy case was selling for $16,000. But in 2006, Neiman Marcus upped the ante with a trip to outer space for $1.7 million.

In comparison to a trip to outer space, an Ipad is a far less extravagant gift but with its use a child could take a trip into virtual space for a lot less money. Perhaps you have certain expectations of what you hope to find waiting for you under the Christmas tree. If you put your hope in what Christmas offers, however, you will be very disappointed.

But if you can get past that to what Christmas is really all about, it truly can be “the most wonderful time of the year.”

The wise men brought the rather unusual gifts of gold, frankincense, and myrrh to Jesus. But the first Christmas gifts were not gifts to the Child. The first Christmas gift was the gift of the Child.

And that is this week’s tail feather

But those who are waiting for the Lord will have new strength; they will get wings like eagles: running, they will not be tired, and walking, they will have no weariness. Isaiah 40:31 (BBE)

Along for the journey

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